Sertraline while pregnant

Posted: allmomente Date of post: 17-Feb-2019
The official site for <i>Sertraline</i>

The official site for Sertraline

Pregnancy Category C refers to medicines that have not been studied in pregnant humans but do appear to cause harm to the fetus in animal studies. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) uses a pregnancy category system to classify the possible risks to a fetus when a specific medicine is taken during pregnancy. Philadelphia (PA): Lippincott Williams & Wilkins;2005. Also, medicines that have not been studied in any pregnant women or animals automatically are given a pregnancy Category C rating. Even if a drug does appear to have adverse effects in animal fetuses, it's important to remember that animals do not always respond to medicines the same way that humans do. Therefore, a healthcare provider may still prescribe a pregnancy Category C medicine to a pregnant woman if he or she believes that the benefits to the woman outweigh the possible risks to the unborn child. Are you still sure that you want to clear all of you selected topics? If you choose this option, it cannot be undone, and you'll need to choose at least new topic to continue using your Health Savvy programs. When a woman becomes pregnant, everything she ingests can impact the developing fetus. This includes foods and beverages, as well as over-the-counter drugs, prescription medications, and illegal drugs. For this reason, it is recommended that women avoid using substances as much as possible during their pregnancy. However, this may prove to be difficult if not impossible for some women who depend on prescription medications to function in their daily lives. Zoloft is a prescription medication used to treat several disorders including depression, panic attacks, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), social anxiety disorder, and more. It is an antidepressant classified as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). If you are wondering whether you can take Zoloft while pregnant, schedule a meeting with your doctor to discuss the potential benefits and risks of the medication.

<strong>Sertraline</strong> use during pregnancy and the risk of major malformations.

Sertraline use during pregnancy and the risk of major malformations.

I've just been prescribed Sertraline by a specialist doctor who assures me it is safe to take while pregnant and I wanted to know if anyone else has taken this in a previous pregnancy or even is currently taking it and to know your experience. Searching online about it doesn't give me great confidence but I also trust my GP so I'm confused. I've also been told sertraline is safe in pregnancy, unfortunately it's not an option for me as it makes me too nauseous so I'm on Lexapro instead. I always triple check everything - my meds are prescribed by a specialist perinatal psychiatrist who is the expert of course, but I still always check with both my pharmacist and Mothersafe before I start taking anything new. I'm on sertraline 100mg and have had multiple doctors and pharmacists tell me it is safe to take. even called the company themselves and they assured me thousands of pregnant mums use this and have had healthy babies. I've had no bad side effects on it and it's the only antidepressant that has helped me. everyone is different so I guess just see how you go on it, but risk wise on the baby its quite low! Not generally recommended in pregnancy, except on doctor’s advice At a time when people expect you to be at your happiest, it can be really tricky to navigate depression and the low mood it brings with it. While the NHS does not generally recommend taking sertraline in pregnancy, there are other anti-depressants your GP can prescribe for you, so speak to him/her if you are concerned about how you are feeling, or the drugs you are currently taking. "Sertraline is generally avoided in pregnancy," says MFM’s GP Dr Philippa Kaye. "If you are taking this medication and are planning to conceive or if you are already pregnant and taking it, please do speak to your doctor. Together you can decide on a plan which may involve changing to another antidepressant." Sertraline is one of a range of drugs called SSRIs, and the general consensus is that there are other antidepressants of the same type, such as Prozac, which are considered safer for use during pregnancy. However, the UK Teratology Information Service – which looks at how drugs can affect pregnancy – explains that data on the risks of sertraline can be conflicting. There is ongoing research and in a recent study by the Columbia University Medical Center and the New York State Psychiatric Institute, 840,000 women were evaluated and they discovered there may be an association with taking SSRIs, and an a "lower risk of preterm birth and Caesarean section" and this study "confirm the results from previous research of a higher risk for several neonatal problems." A Danish study of 400,000 children found there was a slightly increased risk of defects with the wall that separates the left and right chambers of the heart, but this was just 0.4% more likely in mums taking SSRI antidepressants, especially sertraline.

<i>Sertraline</i> Zoloft® MotherToBaby

Sertraline Zoloft® MotherToBaby

Antidepressants can react unpredictably with other medicines, including some over-the-counter medicines such as ibuprofen. Always read the patient information leaflet that comes with your medicine to see if there are any medicines you should avoid. If in doubt, your pharmacist or GP should be able to advise you. As a precaution, antidepressants aren't usually recommended for most pregnant women, especially during the early stages of a pregnancy. This is because they might be dangerous for your baby. But exceptions can be made if the risks posed by depression (or other mental health conditions) outweigh any potential risks of treatment. If you're pregnant and depressed, you should discuss the pros and cons of antidepressants with the doctor in charge of your care. Asked if I’d share my experience—most of which I’ve tried to forget—after hearing the news of a study released this week out of the University of Montreal which reports a greater risk of autism in babies exposed to antidepressants in utero. In the spring of 2010 I was suffering terribly from depression and severe anxiety, triggered by the postpartum depression I experienced after the birth of my 19-month-old Addyson. I was working at at the time and had intimate knowledge of the signs of prenatal depression (hey, as an editor at a parenting magazine, it was my job to know). I was four months pregnant with my daughter Peyton and utterly miserable — it was almost painful to work, concentrate and focus, I was often upset for no reason, and would break down in tears in random bathroom stalls at work and in public. I got irritated easily and I lived in a constant state of fear of pretty much anything I could dream up. That sweet euphoria I’d experienced during my first pregnancy was long gone; things that would normally excite me or give me pleasure (peanut butter cups, . My imagination had gone berserk and I was constantly convinced that something catastrophic would happen to Addyson and my husband, Peter.

Zoloft Birth Defects I Birth Injury Guide
Zoloft Birth Defects I Birth Injury Guide

While the aforementioned risks to pregnant women are an alarming possibility, infant birth defect risks are also. Oct 31, 2018. Deciding to continue or stop using antidepressants during pregnancy is one of the hardest decisions a woman must make. Untreated.

Sertraline while pregnant
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